We’ve learned, time and time again, that damming rivers causes all  sorts of problems for both nature and society—and yet we keep building  dams all over the world. World Rivers Review, the quarterly magazine of the advocacy group International Rivers, reports on the state of the world’s free-flowing rivers—those that remain, that is:

Of the world’s 177 largest rivers, only one-third are free  flowing, and just 21 rivers longer than 1,000 kilometers retain a direct  connection to the sea. Damming has led to species extinctions, loss of  prime farmland and forests, social upheaval, loss of clean water  supplies, dessicated wetlands, destroyed fisheries and more. …


Unfortunately, the nations building the most dams—India,  China, and Brazil—do not have legislation to protect the free-flowing  status of their rivers, and are not using the laws they do have to  protect important rivers.

Keep reading …

We’ve learned, time and time again, that damming rivers causes all sorts of problems for both nature and society—and yet we keep building dams all over the world. World Rivers Review, the quarterly magazine of the advocacy group International Rivers, reports on the state of the world’s free-flowing rivers—those that remain, that is:

Of the world’s 177 largest rivers, only one-third are free flowing, and just 21 rivers longer than 1,000 kilometers retain a direct connection to the sea. Damming has led to species extinctions, loss of prime farmland and forests, social upheaval, loss of clean water supplies, dessicated wetlands, destroyed fisheries and more. …

Unfortunately, the nations building the most dams—India, China, and Brazil—do not have legislation to protect the free-flowing status of their rivers, and are not using the laws they do have to protect important rivers.

Keep reading …