Despite the overwhelming popularity of the blog as a means of  proliferating ideas and opinions, zines—those ever-so-frugally produced  mini-books you might see next to the cash register at your community  bookstore or stuffed illegally in between issues of USA Today—are  flourishing as a literary form. Perhaps this is because zines and blogs  attract different kinds of people. While blogging allows writers to  (maybe) reach the world with a single mouse-click, producing a zine  requires a much greater effort—and the potential audience for a zine is  only as large as the number of copies its publisher can afford to print  up at Kinko’s. Some would say that makes zines inefficient and  unnecessary, but those who produce the little magazines argue that it’s a  labor of love. There is a certain satisfaction in producing a physical  object, after all, and in the publishing world, zines are the ultimate  incarnation of an independent press.
Recently, a public gymnasium in Utne’s hometown hosted Twin Cities Zinefest,  an annual event designed to bring Minneapolis’ underground publishing  community together, and to let the public know that it exists. After the jump are  some highlights from the one-day festival (and yes, after that lead-in,  we understand the irony in directing you to the websites of zine  publishers).
Check it, yo …

Despite the overwhelming popularity of the blog as a means of proliferating ideas and opinions, zines—those ever-so-frugally produced mini-books you might see next to the cash register at your community bookstore or stuffed illegally in between issues of USA Today—are flourishing as a literary form. Perhaps this is because zines and blogs attract different kinds of people. While blogging allows writers to (maybe) reach the world with a single mouse-click, producing a zine requires a much greater effort—and the potential audience for a zine is only as large as the number of copies its publisher can afford to print up at Kinko’s. Some would say that makes zines inefficient and unnecessary, but those who produce the little magazines argue that it’s a labor of love. There is a certain satisfaction in producing a physical object, after all, and in the publishing world, zines are the ultimate incarnation of an independent press.

Recently, a public gymnasium in Utne’s hometown hosted Twin Cities Zinefest, an annual event designed to bring Minneapolis’ underground publishing community together, and to let the public know that it exists. After the jump are some highlights from the one-day festival (and yes, after that lead-in, we understand the irony in directing you to the websites of zine publishers).

Check it, yo …