Fair Trade is a Better Brew for Anti-Capitalists: Remember when buying fair trade meant something revolutionary? These  days, purchasing fair trade products is about as subversive as wearing a  Rage Against the Machine t-shirt. Heck, you’ll even be able to add  “one-of-a-kind handicrafts made by artisans in developing countries” to  your online shopping cart on WalMart’s website, according to Huffington Post.
Coffee was one of the first—and most effectively marketed—fair  trade products. As I write this, I’m finishing my fourth cup of fair  trade coffee this morning—we usually brew two massive pots every day at  the Utne Reader office. But fair trade coffee, a certified  product meant to supplant the neo-colonial exploitation of farmers in  the global South, has done little to impress free trade skeptics and  anti-capitalists.
Keep reading …

Fair Trade is a Better Brew for Anti-Capitalists: Remember when buying fair trade meant something revolutionary? These days, purchasing fair trade products is about as subversive as wearing a Rage Against the Machine t-shirt. Heck, you’ll even be able to add “one-of-a-kind handicrafts made by artisans in developing countries” to your online shopping cart on WalMart’s website, according to Huffington Post.

Coffee was one of the first—and most effectively marketed—fair trade products. As I write this, I’m finishing my fourth cup of fair trade coffee this morning—we usually brew two massive pots every day at the Utne Reader office. But fair trade coffee, a certified product meant to supplant the neo-colonial exploitation of farmers in the global South, has done little to impress free trade skeptics and anti-capitalists.

Keep reading …