In Walter Mosley’s fourth quick-hit political manifesto, the African American author best known for his jazzy Easy Rawlins mystery series (Black Betty, Devil in a Blue Dress)  doesn’t blame the system, or even the man, for America’s political,  economic, and cultural decline. He simply points out that free-market  capitalism is incompatible with democracy, and that it works most  efficiently when its benefactors—in this case the rich, ruling  class—condition people to fear dissent and accept that the price of  doing business includes poverty, war, and spiritual subjugation.
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In Walter Mosley’s fourth quick-hit political manifesto, the African American author best known for his jazzy Easy Rawlins mystery series (Black Betty, Devil in a Blue Dress) doesn’t blame the system, or even the man, for America’s political, economic, and cultural decline. He simply points out that free-market capitalism is incompatible with democracy, and that it works most efficiently when its benefactors—in this case the rich, ruling class—condition people to fear dissent and accept that the price of doing business includes poverty, war, and spiritual subjugation.

Keep reading …