Bugs have always been in our houses and on our persons.
Truly, the arthropods shall inherit the earth. Or they would if they  weren’t already running the show: Insects outnumber us 200 million to 1.  Ants alone may account for as much as one-third of all animal biomass  on earth, according to an estimate by Harvard biologist E.O. Wilson. But  in the summer of 2010 bedbugs seemed to be on our minds more than  usual.
New York, and therefore a large portion of American news  consumers, were terrorized by bedbugs. But so what? There’s a story like  that almost every summer, because reporters have less news to cover yet  just as many pages and broadcast hours to fill.
So bedbugs are no big deal and you should sleep easy, America. Bedbugs are not as bad as you’ve heard. Right?
Actually,  they are much worse than you have heard, says Gail Getty, a leading  bedbug expert and entomologist at the University of  California–Berkeley’s Urban Pest Management Center. “I don’t think  people should necessarily panic at this point, but everything we know in  the scientific community suggests this is going to get worse,” Getty  says. Keep reading …
(Image by Matt Mignanelli)

Bugs have always been in our houses and on our persons.

Truly, the arthropods shall inherit the earth. Or they would if they weren’t already running the show: Insects outnumber us 200 million to 1. Ants alone may account for as much as one-third of all animal biomass on earth, according to an estimate by Harvard biologist E.O. Wilson. But in the summer of 2010 bedbugs seemed to be on our minds more than usual.

New York, and therefore a large portion of American news consumers, were terrorized by bedbugs. But so what? There’s a story like that almost every summer, because reporters have less news to cover yet just as many pages and broadcast hours to fill.

So bedbugs are no big deal and you should sleep easy, America. Bedbugs are not as bad as you’ve heard. Right?

Actually, they are much worse than you have heard, says Gail Getty, a leading bedbug expert and entomologist at the University of California–Berkeley’s Urban Pest Management Center. “I don’t think people should necessarily panic at this point, but everything we know in the scientific community suggests this is going to get worse,” Getty says. Keep reading …

(Image by Matt Mignanelli)