newspaperblackout:

Blackout poetry by 10 year olds

This afternoon, some children in More Class made their own blackout poems inspired by the American artist and writer, Austin Kleon.

Too cool! Filed under: classroom

newspaperblackout:

Blackout poetry by 10 year olds

This afternoon, some children in More Class made their own blackout poems inspired by the American artist and writer, Austin Kleon.

Too cool! Filed under: classroom

While no parent wants a petulant, argumentative teenager, cultivating  a skill set for feisty debate in secondary school may be the most  effective way to ensure a reasoned adulthood.
Columbia University’s Deanna Kuhn, a psychology professor whose  work in cognitive science and education was recently profiled by Miller-McCune (now called Pacific Standard, by the way),  worries argument “based on substantive claims, sound reasoning, and  relevant evidence” is dying out—yet, in our ever more complex world, is  ever more crucial. How, she set out to uncover, could we foster a  generation of rational, well-informed citizens to meet the challenges of tomorrow?
Though a geeky staple of secondary education, debate club was  not the solution Kuhn investigated. Instead, she went meta. As in,  metaphysical.
Keep reading …

While no parent wants a petulant, argumentative teenager, cultivating a skill set for feisty debate in secondary school may be the most effective way to ensure a reasoned adulthood.

Columbia University’s Deanna Kuhn, a psychology professor whose work in cognitive science and education was recently profiled by Miller-McCune (now called Pacific Standard, by the way), worries argument “based on substantive claims, sound reasoning, and relevant evidence” is dying out—yet, in our ever more complex world, is ever more crucial. How, she set out to uncover, could we foster a generation of rational, well-informed citizens to meet the challenges of tomorrow?

Though a geeky staple of secondary education, debate club was not the solution Kuhn investigated. Instead, she went meta. As in, metaphysical.

Keep reading …

pozmagazine:

Despite the presence of sex education courses, U.S. states with high degrees of conservatism and religiosity have above-average adolescent birthrates.

Have you ever wondered how the exuberant energy of elementary school–aged children might be harnessed and put to good use? It seems the Dutch company De Café Racer has found a way, with a kid-powered bicycle intended to replace the traditional school bus.
The bike is pedaled by 1 adult (who is essential for steering and safety’s sake) and up to 10 children, reports Kate Malongowski in YES! Magazine. Designed for kids ranging in age from 4 to 12, the bike can reach a speed of 10 miles per hour, is available in a variety of colors—including blue, purple, red, and school-bus yellow—and has adjustable seats to accommodate its growing riders’ extra inches. In addition, the ride comes with a music system, a canvas cover to ward off rain, and an auxiliary electric motor for when the hills get too steep or the pedal pushers run out of steam.
Keep reading …

Have you ever wondered how the exuberant energy of elementary school–aged children might be harnessed and put to good use? It seems the Dutch company De Café Racer has found a way, with a kid-powered bicycle intended to replace the traditional school bus.

The bike is pedaled by 1 adult (who is essential for steering and safety’s sake) and up to 10 children, reports Kate Malongowski in YES! Magazine. Designed for kids ranging in age from 4 to 12, the bike can reach a speed of 10 miles per hour, is available in a variety of colors—including blue, purple, red, and school-bus yellow—and has adjustable seats to accommodate its growing riders’ extra inches. In addition, the ride comes with a music system, a canvas cover to ward off rain, and an auxiliary electric motor for when the hills get too steep or the pedal pushers run out of steam.

Keep reading …

By almost every measure, Cupertino High School in northern California is  a successful place. Perched in the heart of Silicon Valley, Cupertino  sent 85 percent of its senior class to college in 2009, and hundreds of  its students take advanced placement classes each year.
But some of Cupertino’s kids are doing better than others. On average,  students there excel on California’s Academic Performance Index. The  target is 800; Cupertino students scored 893. Latino students, however,  who make up 10 percent of the school’s population, scored 780, just  under the statewide goal.
Recently, a group of social and cognitive psychologists have  hypothesized that at least some academic disparities spring from toxic  stereotypes that cause ethnic-minority and other students to question  whether they belong in school and can do well there. While such a major  problem might seem to require widespread social change, the  psychologists are finding that quick classroom exercises that bolster  students’ resistance to stereotypes can make a surprisingly large  difference.
They’ve gotten dramatic results: In one of the  best-known studies, low-performing black middle school students who  completed several 15-minute classroom writing exercises raised their  GPAs by nearly half a point over two years, compared with a control  group.
A growing body of evidence also shows that the  interventions can work, not only among black middle school students, but  also for women, minority college students, and other populations.
“When  this was first described to me, I was skeptical,” says physics  professor Michael Dubson, who participated in one of the studies. “But  now that I think about it, we all know that it’s possible to damage a  student in 15 minutes. It’s easy to wreck someone’s self-esteem. So if  that’s possible, then maybe it’s also possible to improve it.”
Keep reading …

By almost every measure, Cupertino High School in northern California is a successful place. Perched in the heart of Silicon Valley, Cupertino sent 85 percent of its senior class to college in 2009, and hundreds of its students take advanced placement classes each year.

But some of Cupertino’s kids are doing better than others. On average, students there excel on California’s Academic Performance Index. The target is 800; Cupertino students scored 893. Latino students, however, who make up 10 percent of the school’s population, scored 780, just under the statewide goal.

Recently, a group of social and cognitive psychologists have hypothesized that at least some academic disparities spring from toxic stereotypes that cause ethnic-minority and other students to question whether they belong in school and can do well there. While such a major problem might seem to require widespread social change, the psychologists are finding that quick classroom exercises that bolster students’ resistance to stereotypes can make a surprisingly large difference.

They’ve gotten dramatic results: In one of the best-known studies, low-performing black middle school students who completed several 15-minute classroom writing exercises raised their GPAs by nearly half a point over two years, compared with a control group.

A growing body of evidence also shows that the interventions can work, not only among black middle school students, but also for women, minority college students, and other populations.

“When this was first described to me, I was skeptical,” says physics professor Michael Dubson, who participated in one of the studies. “But now that I think about it, we all know that it’s possible to damage a student in 15 minutes. It’s easy to wreck someone’s self-esteem. So if that’s possible, then maybe it’s also possible to improve it.”

Keep reading …

It causes the most ardent supporters of arts in the schools to hesitate: “We want to give your children the blues.”
In what may initially seem a backwards idea, the Chicago School of Blues  has couched a message of positivity in a program that combines the  history, music, and movement associated with the blues. The traveling  program has been taking this message to Chicago-area schools,  cultivating the self-expression and freedom that is so often lost with  shrinking arts budgets. In the process, it is preserving an art form  that is forever woven into the historical fabric of the city.
Keep reading …

It causes the most ardent supporters of arts in the schools to hesitate: “We want to give your children the blues.”

In what may initially seem a backwards idea, the Chicago School of Blues has couched a message of positivity in a program that combines the history, music, and movement associated with the blues. The traveling program has been taking this message to Chicago-area schools, cultivating the self-expression and freedom that is so often lost with shrinking arts budgets. In the process, it is preserving an art form that is forever woven into the historical fabric of the city.

Keep reading …

Graduating from Standardized Tests: Forward-thinking education reformers are trying to kill the standardized  test in American public schools. Unfortunately, there are a few  roadblocks. Keep reading …

Graduating from Standardized Tests: Forward-thinking education reformers are trying to kill the standardized test in American public schools. Unfortunately, there are a few roadblocks. Keep reading …

Shimon Schocken used to mountain-bike past a juvenile correctional facility in Israel, says Dirt Rag, and wonder “What’s going on behind those barbed wires?”  One day he stopped in and offered to take the boys for a ride. He  envisioned a different path to delinquent recovery—a dusty, rocky,  uphill trail traversed on the saddle of a mountain bike. And the warden  agreed.
For five years now, Schocken, a computer science professor from  Ra’anana, Israel, has pulled 10 young people out of the facility every  Tuesday to bike on remote country trails.
Of 50 released participants, Shocken says, “only 5 of them went back to  jail, which is extremely good. Normally, 50 percent will end up back in  jail within a year.”

Shimon Schocken used to mountain-bike past a juvenile correctional facility in Israel, says Dirt Rag, and wonder “What’s going on behind those barbed wires?” One day he stopped in and offered to take the boys for a ride. He envisioned a different path to delinquent recovery—a dusty, rocky, uphill trail traversed on the saddle of a mountain bike. And the warden agreed.

For five years now, Schocken, a computer science professor from Ra’anana, Israel, has pulled 10 young people out of the facility every Tuesday to bike on remote country trails.

Of 50 released participants, Shocken says, “only 5 of them went back to jail, which is extremely good. Normally, 50 percent will end up back in jail within a year.”

The nuclear industry is selling its vision of a bright nuclear future to  schoolchildren by offering teachers free education tools extolling the  benefits of radiation. The classroom presentations, activities, and games are the  marketing brainchild of the EnergySolutions Foundation, the charitable  arm of a large nuclear-waste processor, and they’ve already been doled  out to classrooms in Mississippi, Louisiana, and elsewhere. Keep reading …

The nuclear industry is selling its vision of a bright nuclear future to schoolchildren by offering teachers free education tools extolling the benefits of radiation. The classroom presentations, activities, and games are the marketing brainchild of the EnergySolutions Foundation, the charitable arm of a large nuclear-waste processor, and they’ve already been doled out to classrooms in Mississippi, Louisiana, and elsewhere. Keep reading …

When Smart Kids Grow Up: Were you one of those students who made schoolwork look easy, earning  a galaxy of gold stars and an alphabet of A’s between your first  morning of kindergarten and your graduation day? Did everyone gush over  how smart you were?
If so, you might know the curse of the gifted child. An  overload of affirmations can hamper the future success of bright kids,  reports Heidi Grant Halvorson for Harvard Business Review. Students who receive praise for intellect rather than effort,  she reports, develop a belief that their abilities are innate and  unchangeable. As adults, they lose confidence in trying to develop new,  difficult skills. They get stuck. Halvorson writes:

People with above-average aptitudes—the ones we recognize as  being especially clever, creative, insightful, or otherwise  accomplished—often judge their abilities not only more harshly, but  fundamentally differently, than others do (particularly in Western  cultures). Gifted children grow up to be more vulnerable, and less  confident, even when they should be the most confident people in the  room.

Keep reading …

When Smart Kids Grow Up: Were you one of those students who made schoolwork look easy, earning a galaxy of gold stars and an alphabet of A’s between your first morning of kindergarten and your graduation day? Did everyone gush over how smart you were?

If so, you might know the curse of the gifted child. An overload of affirmations can hamper the future success of bright kids, reports Heidi Grant Halvorson for Harvard Business Review. Students who receive praise for intellect rather than effort, she reports, develop a belief that their abilities are innate and unchangeable. As adults, they lose confidence in trying to develop new, difficult skills. They get stuck. Halvorson writes:

People with above-average aptitudes—the ones we recognize as being especially clever, creative, insightful, or otherwise accomplished—often judge their abilities not only more harshly, but fundamentally differently, than others do (particularly in Western cultures). Gifted children grow up to be more vulnerable, and less confident, even when they should be the most confident people in the room.

Keep reading …