In this continuing series, Utne Reader Art Director Stephanie Glaros explains the process behind an Utne Reader illustration. This installment breaks down David Gothard’s illustration for “Criminal Minds,” an article in our Nov-Dec 2011 issue. Keep reading …

Tags: illustration

Utne Reader’s Stephanie Glaros on the details of doing her job as an art director.

Once in a while, an illustrator comes to my attention whose style is unlike any other I’ve seen. Although I can’t recall how I first came across Keith Greiman’s work, I knew instantly that he was someone who I wanted to get into the magazine. His characters are really fun, and I especially appreciate his use of color. I recently commissioned Keith to illustrate the article “The Gospel According to…,” which describes a bible without God. I knew Keith would have fun playing with the idea of mixing secular and Christian elements. Indeed, his final art includes the coolest version of Noah’s Ark I’ve ever seen, and the surrealistic colors made this piece one of my favorites in the whole issue.

Utne Reader’s Stephanie Glaros on the details of doing her job as an art director.

Once in a while, an illustrator comes to my attention whose style is unlike any other I’ve seen. Although I can’t recall how I first came across Keith Greiman’s work, I knew instantly that he was someone who I wanted to get into the magazine. His characters are really fun, and I especially appreciate his use of color. I recently commissioned Keith to illustrate the article “The Gospel According to…,” which describes a bible without God. I knew Keith would have fun playing with the idea of mixing secular and Christian elements. Indeed, his final art includes the coolest version of Noah’s Ark I’ve ever seen, and the surrealistic colors made this piece one of my favorites in the whole issue.

(via Hey Mister)
nationalpost:

Extremely Bad Advice: In The Sick Of ItHi Steve, There has been a recent outbreak of sick people coming in to work at the offce. I’ve tried subtly (and not-so-subtly) asking them to stay home, but they refuse. How can I get these overachievers and their germs out of here?STEP ONE Ugh, people like that make me sick. Literally, they make me sick, with their germs and their cooties. Most folks have a sickness breaking point where they’ll finally go home. For some, it’s a sore throat; for others, it’s vomiting on their keyboard, rendering it useless. The trick here is to push your stoic plague-carriers to their personal point-of-no-return-to-work, where they realize that they’d be better off at home, on a couch watching Dr. Oz. You’ll need to get other office workers in on this, but there are a few ways to achieve your goal. You can crank the heat in the office and insist that it’s fine, you can get everyone to talk in a deliberately slow cadence, you can add weights in their phone and mouse, etc. Basically, anything to make the workplace a surreal sweatbox.

lulz

nationalpost:

Extremely Bad Advice: In The Sick Of It
Hi Steve, There has been a recent outbreak of sick people coming in to work at the offce. I’ve tried subtly (and not-so-subtly) asking them to stay home, but they refuse. How can I get these overachievers and their germs out of here?

STEP ONE Ugh, people like that make me sick. Literally, they make me sick, with their germs and their cooties. Most folks have a sickness breaking point where they’ll finally go home. For some, it’s a sore throat; for others, it’s vomiting on their keyboard, rendering it useless. The trick here is to push your stoic plague-carriers to their personal point-of-no-return-to-work, where they realize that they’d be better off at home, on a couch watching Dr. Oz. You’ll need to get other office workers in on this, but there are a few ways to achieve your goal. You can crank the heat in the office and insist that it’s fine, you can get everyone to talk in a deliberately slow cadence, you can add weights in their phone and mouse, etc. Basically, anything to make the workplace a surreal sweatbox.

lulz

(via The Australian)

He made the decision after being described in a Sydney newspaper as a “self-confessed sex pervert” and a “very warped human being”.

Crumb, 67, who was among the founders of the underground comix movement in the 1960s and whose characters include Mr Natural and Fritz the Cat, was to be the main attraction at the second annual Graphic festival to be held at Sydney Opera House on August 20 and 21.

Utne Reader Illustrated: This month’s installment—centered around illustrator Gwenda Kaczor—is about infusing child-like optimism into a serious topic. Read more …

Utne Reader Illustrated: This month’s installment—centered around illustrator Gwenda Kaczor—is about infusing child-like optimism into a serious topic. Read more …

SVK, an experimental one-shot comic written by Warren Ellis (of Transmetropolitan notoriety)  and Matt Brooker, has an extra layer of subtext hidden among its pages.  Illuminating the comic’s pages with ultraviolet light reveals  additional dialogue that belies characters’ most secret thoughts. SVK is a cyberpunky crime story “about  cities, technology and surveillance, mixed with human themes of the  power, corruption and lies that lurk in the data-smog of our  near-future.” The comic comes with a small UV-emitting reader, so you  don’t need to bring the comic to a rave to read the invisible ink. In a word, neato. Read more …

SVK, an experimental one-shot comic written by Warren Ellis (of Transmetropolitan notoriety) and Matt Brooker, has an extra layer of subtext hidden among its pages. Illuminating the comic’s pages with ultraviolet light reveals additional dialogue that belies characters’ most secret thoughts. SVK is a cyberpunky crime story “about cities, technology and surveillance, mixed with human themes of the power, corruption and lies that lurk in the data-smog of our near-future.” The comic comes with a small UV-emitting reader, so you don’t need to bring the comic to a rave to read the invisible ink. In a word, neato. Read more …

Utne Reader Illustrated: On how artist Brett Affrunti captured the breezy swagger of Jelly Roll Morton and stodgy professionalism of Alan Lomax. Read more …

Utne Reader Illustrated: On how artist Brett Affrunti captured the breezy swagger of Jelly Roll Morton and stodgy professionalism of Alan Lomax. Read more …

The Crockpot: A Weekly Link-Digest from Utne

Artorical’s Obey-style Ai Weiwei poster “Love the Future” (link)

Artorical’s Obey-style Ai Weiwei poster “Love the Future” (link)