The art of cursive handwriting is at a crossroads. Touch-typing on a  computer keyboard has replaced hand-writing on a sheet of paper so fully  that the Indiana Department of Education, in a memo to the state’s elementary school principals (April 25, 2011), has officially canceled cursive writing from the state curriculum, replacing it with keyboarding.
Some educators have been calling for the end of handwriting  for years. But handwriting is not an antediluvian method of  communication to be tossed aside in favor of e-learning, reports the Los Angeles Times (June 15, 2011). The motion of writing out letters and words and sentences by hand stimulates the brain in a way that keyboarding does not. Perhaps it is not so different than  the way reading a book activates the brain differently than hearing the  same information or watching it on a television screen. None of this is  to say that computers and TV can’t be educational, but the tactile,  memory-creating relationship between you and your language lessens once  the re-creation of the letters by your own hand is taken out of the  equation.
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The art of cursive handwriting is at a crossroads. Touch-typing on a computer keyboard has replaced hand-writing on a sheet of paper so fully that the Indiana Department of Education, in a memo to the state’s elementary school principals (April 25, 2011), has officially canceled cursive writing from the state curriculum, replacing it with keyboarding.

Some educators have been calling for the end of handwriting for years. But handwriting is not an antediluvian method of communication to be tossed aside in favor of e-learning, reports the Los Angeles Times (June 15, 2011). The motion of writing out letters and words and sentences by hand stimulates the brain in a way that keyboarding does not. Perhaps it is not so different than the way reading a book activates the brain differently than hearing the same information or watching it on a television screen. None of this is to say that computers and TV can’t be educational, but the tactile, memory-creating relationship between you and your language lessens once the re-creation of the letters by your own hand is taken out of the equation.

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ineedafavor:

Starting this fall, schools in Indiana won’t have to teach kids how to write in cursive. Until now, kids started learning cursive handwriting in 2nd grade; but state education officials say computers and web books have made cursive a relic of the past; so it won’t be required any more. Local school districts can still teach it if they want; but the state says it’s more important to teach kids good keyboard skills.

What do you think is more important? Keyboarding skills or penmanship?

(Source: ineedafavor)