"To achieve true prosperity, we must create economies grounded in a living systems logic that recognizes three fundamental truths: The economy’s only valid purpose is to serve life. Equality is foundational to healthy human communities and a healthy human relationship to Earth’s biosphere. Money is a means, not an end."

— David Korten, “America’s Deficit Attention Disorder.”

(Source: )

"

The deficit-hawks recoil in horror and assure us that we can reduce government debt while leaving the financial assets of the rich untouched. It makes perfect sense in the fantasy world of pure finance in which profits and the financial assets of the rich grow perpetually even as growing inequality and wasteful material consumption deplete the social capital of community and the natural capital of Earth’s biosphere.

A viable human future, however, must be based on living world realities rather than financial world fantasies.

"

— David Korten, “America’s Deficit Attention Disorder.”

from Slow Money
What would it take to shape a planet on which people, other living  things, and the systems that support us can sustainably coexist? Ben Jervey spoke with Princeton physicist Robert Socolow on  what it would take to rein in greenhouse gas emissions and solve climate  change.
Read the interview …

What would it take to shape a planet on which people, other living things, and the systems that support us can sustainably coexist? Ben Jervey spoke with Princeton physicist Robert Socolow on what it would take to rein in greenhouse gas emissions and solve climate change.

Read the interview …

It’s hard to enter a store these days without being visually assaulted  by labels, logos, and signs that appeal to our environmental  consciousness. It turns out that there’s an even more powerful way for  marketers to signal an environmental product to shoppers: Make it brown.
Keep reading …

It’s hard to enter a store these days without being visually assaulted by labels, logos, and signs that appeal to our environmental consciousness. It turns out that there’s an even more powerful way for marketers to signal an environmental product to shoppers: Make it brown.

Keep reading …

The Nature Conservancy is taking a new stripped-down approach to  environmental protection: The green group is teaming up with the Sports Illustrated swimsuit issue and online luxury retailer Gilt to raise money for beach  preservation in an unholy mashup of sex, commerce, marketing,  publishing, and environmentalism.
Why the green tie-in? “Because everyone benefits from pristine  tropical beaches. Especially when they’re occupied by gorgeous women in  bathing suits.” That’s according to promotional prose about the  partnership on the Gilt website, in an announcement that is no longer  posted. (Though you can still buy a $1,000 ticket to a New York launch party where you can hang out with the swimsuit supermodels.)
Environmental writer Derrick Jensen of Orion already saw this  sort of thing coming, having penned a prescient column in the current  issue titled “Not in My Name.” Go ahead and call him a killjoy, but I  think he pretty much nailed it:

Let me say upfront: I like fun, and I like sex. But I’m sick  to death of hearing that we need to make environmentalism fun and sexy. …  The fact that so many people routinely call for environmentalism to be  more fun and more sexy reveals not only the weakness of our movement but  also the utter lack of seriousness with which even many activists  approach the problems we face. …
Unfortunately, the notion that activism … has to be fun and  sexy pervades the entire environmental movement, from the most  self-styled radical to the most mainstream reformist.


Keep reading …

The Nature Conservancy is taking a new stripped-down approach to environmental protection: The green group is teaming up with the Sports Illustrated swimsuit issue and online luxury retailer Gilt to raise money for beach preservation in an unholy mashup of sex, commerce, marketing, publishing, and environmentalism.

Why the green tie-in? “Because everyone benefits from pristine tropical beaches. Especially when they’re occupied by gorgeous women in bathing suits.” That’s according to promotional prose about the partnership on the Gilt website, in an announcement that is no longer posted. (Though you can still buy a $1,000 ticket to a New York launch party where you can hang out with the swimsuit supermodels.)

Environmental writer Derrick Jensen of Orion already saw this sort of thing coming, having penned a prescient column in the current issue titled “Not in My Name.” Go ahead and call him a killjoy, but I think he pretty much nailed it:

Let me say upfront: I like fun, and I like sex. But I’m sick to death of hearing that we need to make environmentalism fun and sexy. … The fact that so many people routinely call for environmentalism to be more fun and more sexy reveals not only the weakness of our movement but also the utter lack of seriousness with which even many activists approach the problems we face. …

Unfortunately, the notion that activism … has to be fun and sexy pervades the entire environmental movement, from the most self-styled radical to the most mainstream reformist.

Keep reading …

Composed of compressed sawdust, coffee beans, or green tea leaves, these toys offer a sustainability-minded spin on the stackable, rearrangeable form of classic LEGOs.

Have the eco-parents gone too far?!?!

Welcome to the Jungle:We’ve come to expect a level of debauchery and reckless abandon from rock stars, but what about the people who make their guitars? Turns out, Gibson Guitar Corporation and other manufacturers are knocking down protected forests like they’re shot glasses full of Jägermeister.
Keep reading …

Welcome to the Jungle:We’ve come to expect a level of debauchery and reckless abandon from rock stars, but what about the people who make their guitars? Turns out, Gibson Guitar Corporation and other manufacturers are knocking down protected forests like they’re shot glasses full of Jägermeister.

Keep reading …

Europe’s great forests are largely gone, but there’s one  often-overlooked country where lynx, wolves, moose, and wild boars still  roam under dense tree cover: Latvia. Jeremy Hance reports in Mongabay on the Baltic nation’s richly diverse forests, and how they’re being endangered by an alarming logging spree during these strained economic times:

Facing tough circumstances, the country turned to its most  important and abundant natural resource: forests. The Latvian government  accepted a new plan for the nation’s forests, which has resulted in  logging at rates many scientists say are clearly unsustainable. In  addition, researchers contend that the on-the-ground practices of  state-owned timber giant, Latvijas Valsts meži (LVM), are hurting  wildlife and destroying rare ecosystems.

Keep reading …

Europe’s great forests are largely gone, but there’s one often-overlooked country where lynx, wolves, moose, and wild boars still roam under dense tree cover: Latvia. Jeremy Hance reports in Mongabay on the Baltic nation’s richly diverse forests, and how they’re being endangered by an alarming logging spree during these strained economic times:

Facing tough circumstances, the country turned to its most important and abundant natural resource: forests. The Latvian government accepted a new plan for the nation’s forests, which has resulted in logging at rates many scientists say are clearly unsustainable. In addition, researchers contend that the on-the-ground practices of state-owned timber giant, Latvijas Valsts meži (LVM), are hurting wildlife and destroying rare ecosystems.

Keep reading …

LEED-certified architecture was conceived by a nonprofit to save energy  on heating and cooling, but it also makes for big business. According to  the watchdogs at Mother Jones, an  office building certified for Leadership in Energy and Environmental  Design costs $171 more to build per square foot than a typical  structure—and the standards may be better at generating publicity than  at encouraging truly cost-effective, environmentally friendly energy. At  least that’s the contention of energy consultant Henry Gifford, who has  filed a series of lawsuits against the U.S. Green Building Council,  which developed the internationally recognized rating system.
Keep reading …

LEED-certified architecture was conceived by a nonprofit to save energy on heating and cooling, but it also makes for big business. According to the watchdogs at Mother Jones, an office building certified for Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design costs $171 more to build per square foot than a typical structure—and the standards may be better at generating publicity than at encouraging truly cost-effective, environmentally friendly energy. At least that’s the contention of energy consultant Henry Gifford, who has filed a series of lawsuits against the U.S. Green Building Council, which developed the internationally recognized rating system.

Keep reading …