Herbert Benson is the father of modern mind-body medicine. From the late  1960s onward, his breakthrough research has demonstrated that the  “relaxation response,” which can be elicited through a variety of  methods—including meditation—is a natural antidote to stress.
A graduate of Wesleyan University and the Harvard Medical School,  Benson is the author or coauthor of over 180 scientific publications and  12 books. In 2006 he became director emeritus of the Benson-Henry  Institute for Mind Body Medicine at Massachusetts General Hospital.
For the latest issue of Utne Reader,  Benson describes his discovery of the relaxation response and its  potential for filling a major gap in contemporary health care.
Keep reading …

Herbert Benson is the father of modern mind-body medicine. From the late 1960s onward, his breakthrough research has demonstrated that the “relaxation response,” which can be elicited through a variety of methods—including meditation—is a natural antidote to stress.

A graduate of Wesleyan University and the Harvard Medical School, Benson is the author or coauthor of over 180 scientific publications and 12 books. In 2006 he became director emeritus of the Benson-Henry Institute for Mind Body Medicine at Massachusetts General Hospital.

For the latest issue of Utne Reader, Benson describes his discovery of the relaxation response and its potential for filling a major gap in contemporary health care.

Keep reading …

How Doctors Choose to Die

Doctors have the very best medical care at their fingertips. They read journals that publish the latest medical findings; they know the most up-to-date treatments for various ailments and diseases; they might even play golf with a top surgeon or two. And yet, when faced with death, many physicians forgo intensive medical treatment.

Doctors “don’t die like the rest of us,” writes Ken Murray for Zócalo Public Square, primarily because “they know enough about modern medicine to know its limits.” Most medical professionals regularly see futile care in action—ineffective CPR attempts, unnecessary surgeries, and expensive drug treatments; patients hooked up to hospital IVs and machines for weeks or months before passing.

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New York fashion photographer David Jay is seeking to update the face of  breast cancer awareness from frothy pink to strikingly honest pictures  of the women scarred by mastectomy surgery. His message: “Breast cancer  is not a pink ribbon.”
Keep reading …

New York fashion photographer David Jay is seeking to update the face of breast cancer awareness from frothy pink to strikingly honest pictures of the women scarred by mastectomy surgery. His message: “Breast cancer is not a pink ribbon.”

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ryking:

LGBT topics get little time in med school

Lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender patients present unique challenges to treating physicians, but their specific needs may not be getting enough attention in some medical schools.
44 medical schools reported dedicating no teaching time to LGBT-related content during clinical years, and in preclinical curricula, nine medical schools reported spending no time on LGBT issues, according to a study published Tuesday in the Journal of the American Medical Association.
Surveys used in the study were distributed to all 176 allopathic (conventional) and osteopathic medical schools in the U.S. and Canada, and 85% of schools responded.

ryking:

LGBT topics get little time in med school

Lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender patients present unique challenges to treating physicians, but their specific needs may not be getting enough attention in some medical schools.

44 medical schools reported dedicating no teaching time to LGBT-related content during clinical years, and in preclinical curricula, nine medical schools reported spending no time on LGBT issues, according to a study published Tuesday in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Surveys used in the study were distributed to all 176 allopathic (conventional) and osteopathic medical schools in the U.S. and Canada, and 85% of schools responded.

(Source: diadoumenos)

The walk from the front door of my house to the bus stop wasn’t a long one, but it was made treacherous by the need to cross a busy and poorly marked service road. I stood at the corner and waited for the walk sign to change, unwilling to take any chances. Unfortunately, the driver of the large white van that ran me down wasn’t so conscientious. Halfway through the crosswalk I saw him blow the light and swerve toward me. I knew I couldn’t get out of the way in time, so I waved my arms to signal for him to stop. He didn’t.

I’ll spare you the gory details of what came next, but suffice to say I never made it to class. Broken, bruised, and burned, I spent weeks in the hospital, undergoing multiple surgeries to mend injuries that probably would have killed an older man outright. (”Do you have any medical conditions we should know about?” a doctor asked me through the haze of morphine. “You mean aside from being run over?” I groaned.) I was grateful to be alive, but I knew I had a long recovery ahead of me — one that would be measured in years rather than months — and I knew it was going to cost me. Suddenly, the health care debate playing out on TV wasn’t so abstract. If I was a “young invincible,” I’d just been struck by a Kryptonite meteor.