A New Section at the Bookstore
‘Cli-fi’ is an emerging genre that merges literature’s latitude with today’s climate change problems.

A New Section at the Bookstore

‘Cli-fi’ is an emerging genre that merges literature’s latitude with today’s climate change problems.

Selling loyalty, slinging deals, getting screwed, and getting even.

You smooth your new slacks. The tag says “Express,” but you bought them at TJ Maxx, the one just across from the Barnes & Noble, at the Kirkland mall. You are not allowed to wear jeans at Barnes & Noble, or sneakers, or logos of any sort. This is in the “Welcome to Our Team” employee handbook you received last week. …

This is a story about one of the newest forms of communication—social  media—and one of the oldest—poetry—and how the two joined forces for  social change.
On April 20, 2010, nine students chained themselves to the Arizona  state capitol building to protest Arizona’s new anti-immigrant  legislation, SB 1070. Their slogan: “We are chained to the capitol just  like our community is chained by this legislation.” While others chanted  and gave speeches, the nine students sat silently and with dignity as  police officers cut the chains and arrested them. Of course their  protest was posted on YouTube, and when a friend sent the link to  Francisco X. Alarcón, a prize-winning poet and professor at the  University of California–Davis, Alarcón responded as poets have for  millennia when they witness acts of courage in the face of oppression:  He wrote a poem.
Alarcón posted “For the Capitol Nine” to his  Facebook page, addressing the young people directly: “you … / chain  yourselves / to the doors / of the State Capitol / so that terror / will  not leak out / to our streets… / your courage / can’t be taken /  away from us / and put in jail / you are nine / young warriors / like  nine sky stars.”
So many “friends” and “friends of friends”  responded to the poem that Alarcón decided to create a Facebook group  and invite other poets to post poems on the subject.
The word went out over Facebook and Twitter and poet to poet, so that by August 2011 “Poets Responding to SB 1070”  included more than 1,200 poems by prominent and emerging poets from all  over the country and around the world. Eight volunteer moderators now  manage the site, keeping up with submissions and choosing poems for a  weekly feature on La Bloga, the Latino literary blog. They also are preparing a hard-copy anthology.
Keep reading … (Image by Tim Gough)

This is a story about one of the newest forms of communication—social media—and one of the oldest—poetry—and how the two joined forces for social change.

On April 20, 2010, nine students chained themselves to the Arizona state capitol building to protest Arizona’s new anti-immigrant legislation, SB 1070. Their slogan: “We are chained to the capitol just like our community is chained by this legislation.” While others chanted and gave speeches, the nine students sat silently and with dignity as police officers cut the chains and arrested them. Of course their protest was posted on YouTube, and when a friend sent the link to Francisco X. Alarcón, a prize-winning poet and professor at the University of California–Davis, Alarcón responded as poets have for millennia when they witness acts of courage in the face of oppression: He wrote a poem.

Alarcón posted “For the Capitol Nine” to his Facebook page, addressing the young people directly: “you … / chain yourselves / to the doors / of the State Capitol / so that terror / will not leak out / to our streets… / your courage / can’t be taken / away from us / and put in jail / you are nine / young warriors / like nine sky stars.”

So many “friends” and “friends of friends” responded to the poem that Alarcón decided to create a Facebook group and invite other poets to post poems on the subject.

The word went out over Facebook and Twitter and poet to poet, so that by August 2011 “Poets Responding to SB 1070” included more than 1,200 poems by prominent and emerging poets from all over the country and around the world. Eight volunteer moderators now manage the site, keeping up with submissions and choosing poems for a weekly feature on La Bloga, the Latino literary blog. They also are preparing a hard-copy anthology.

Keep reading … (Image by Tim Gough)

"For as long as the culture of business has been an integral part of American life, it has also been frowned upon by important sectors of our society. Among our intellectuals especially, the business world has been the subject of many brutal caricatures, portraying corporations large and small, and the people who run them, as heartless, soulless agents of greed. These caricatures have shaped our implicit understanding of the nature of the business world, so much that they have come to pass for conventional wisdom."

— Algis Valiunas, for National Affairs

betterbooktitles:

Jean de Brunhoff: The Story of Babar
Reader Submission: Title by Kendra Leonard

betterbooktitles:

Jean de Brunhoff: The Story of Babar

Reader Submission: Title by Kendra Leonard

(via The Guardian)

While the upper-classes remain perennially interesting to publishers and readers alike, is it affluent middle-class or working-class characters who are being squeezed out of literary fiction?

Ernest Hemingway’s suicide in 1961—fifty years ago on July 2—“remains  one of the iconic American deaths,” writes Robert Roper for Obit Magazine. “He has come close to being remembered as much for his death as for his work, a terrible fate for a writer.”
Not only was Hemingway a rock star author in his time, but he  also transformed himself into an icon of some his day’s biggest  socio-cultural changes. Which is, of course, why American readers are  perpetually interested in Hemingway’s suicide. Barrel-chested, he  personally stood for liberty and against Fascism before it was  fashionable. Paranoid depression crippled him at the beginning of a new  era of neuroscience and psychological therapy. And Hemingway’s  problematic, overblown masculinity drew near-universal ire from a  burgeoning, radicalizing feminist movement.
Half a century later, can the legacy of Ernest Hemingway escape his suicide?

Ernest Hemingway’s suicide in 1961—fifty years ago on July 2—“remains one of the iconic American deaths,” writes Robert Roper for Obit Magazine. “He has come close to being remembered as much for his death as for his work, a terrible fate for a writer.”

Not only was Hemingway a rock star author in his time, but he also transformed himself into an icon of some his day’s biggest socio-cultural changes. Which is, of course, why American readers are perpetually interested in Hemingway’s suicide. Barrel-chested, he personally stood for liberty and against Fascism before it was fashionable. Paranoid depression crippled him at the beginning of a new era of neuroscience and psychological therapy. And Hemingway’s problematic, overblown masculinity drew near-universal ire from a burgeoning, radicalizing feminist movement.

Half a century later, can the legacy of Ernest Hemingway escape his suicide?

As a former English major, I’ve slashed my way through tons (literally) of books. The aggregate weight of your literary explorations becomes a sort of status symbol on campus, with extra-shiny merit badges awarded for the really heavy tomes—the Ulysseses and Infinite Jests and David Copperfields and The Count of Monte Cristos. From a semi-serious academic perspective, this logorrheaic one-upmanship makes a sort of professional sense, but that doesn’t explain why thousands of non-scholarly types cart along dense snoozers like War and Peace or Les Misérables or Anna Karenina on their sandy vacations when they could actually be having fun. Mark Oconnell has a theory: Readers have Stockholm syndrome. Read more …

thenewinquiry:

By Jennifer Acker

As more aspects of our lives are digitized, literature is an increasingly crucial means of expressing, understanding, and preserving places and their influences.

At the end of the eighties, when I was in middle school, a development threatened a parcel of land a…

(Source: thenewinquiry)