newspaperblackout:

Blackout poetry by 10 year olds

This afternoon, some children in More Class made their own blackout poems inspired by the American artist and writer, Austin Kleon.

Too cool! Filed under: classroom

newspaperblackout:

Blackout poetry by 10 year olds

This afternoon, some children in More Class made their own blackout poems inspired by the American artist and writer, Austin Kleon.

Too cool! Filed under: classroom

newspaperblackout:

A blackout by bourbon-rose

Tags: poetry

The Art of Creative Uncreativity

Consider these page-turners for your next beach vacation: a transcription of all the weather reports from a radio news station recorded over one year, a re-typed issue of The New York Times, a chronicle of the utterances made by one person for an entire week, a similar account of every bodily gesture the same man made over the course of 13 hours, or 600 pages worth of words with rhyming r-sounds. Understandably, you’re probably not tacking these texts onto the bottom of your holiday wish list, much less considering them as notable for anything other than how boring they sound. But Kenneth Goldsmith—an avant-garde poet, experimental radio personality, and professor—considers these litanies to be poetry. In fact, the list is a small sampling of his published works.

Keep reading …

This is a story about one of the newest forms of communication—social  media—and one of the oldest—poetry—and how the two joined forces for  social change.
On April 20, 2010, nine students chained themselves to the Arizona  state capitol building to protest Arizona’s new anti-immigrant  legislation, SB 1070. Their slogan: “We are chained to the capitol just  like our community is chained by this legislation.” While others chanted  and gave speeches, the nine students sat silently and with dignity as  police officers cut the chains and arrested them. Of course their  protest was posted on YouTube, and when a friend sent the link to  Francisco X. Alarcón, a prize-winning poet and professor at the  University of California–Davis, Alarcón responded as poets have for  millennia when they witness acts of courage in the face of oppression:  He wrote a poem.
Alarcón posted “For the Capitol Nine” to his  Facebook page, addressing the young people directly: “you … / chain  yourselves / to the doors / of the State Capitol / so that terror / will  not leak out / to our streets… / your courage / can’t be taken /  away from us / and put in jail / you are nine / young warriors / like  nine sky stars.”
So many “friends” and “friends of friends”  responded to the poem that Alarcón decided to create a Facebook group  and invite other poets to post poems on the subject.
The word went out over Facebook and Twitter and poet to poet, so that by August 2011 “Poets Responding to SB 1070”  included more than 1,200 poems by prominent and emerging poets from all  over the country and around the world. Eight volunteer moderators now  manage the site, keeping up with submissions and choosing poems for a  weekly feature on La Bloga, the Latino literary blog. They also are preparing a hard-copy anthology.
Keep reading … (Image by Tim Gough)

This is a story about one of the newest forms of communication—social media—and one of the oldest—poetry—and how the two joined forces for social change.

On April 20, 2010, nine students chained themselves to the Arizona state capitol building to protest Arizona’s new anti-immigrant legislation, SB 1070. Their slogan: “We are chained to the capitol just like our community is chained by this legislation.” While others chanted and gave speeches, the nine students sat silently and with dignity as police officers cut the chains and arrested them. Of course their protest was posted on YouTube, and when a friend sent the link to Francisco X. Alarcón, a prize-winning poet and professor at the University of California–Davis, Alarcón responded as poets have for millennia when they witness acts of courage in the face of oppression: He wrote a poem.

Alarcón posted “For the Capitol Nine” to his Facebook page, addressing the young people directly: “you … / chain yourselves / to the doors / of the State Capitol / so that terror / will not leak out / to our streets… / your courage / can’t be taken / away from us / and put in jail / you are nine / young warriors / like nine sky stars.”

So many “friends” and “friends of friends” responded to the poem that Alarcón decided to create a Facebook group and invite other poets to post poems on the subject.

The word went out over Facebook and Twitter and poet to poet, so that by August 2011 “Poets Responding to SB 1070” included more than 1,200 poems by prominent and emerging poets from all over the country and around the world. Eight volunteer moderators now manage the site, keeping up with submissions and choosing poems for a weekly feature on La Bloga, the Latino literary blog. They also are preparing a hard-copy anthology.

Keep reading … (Image by Tim Gough)

“Should we consider Jim Morrison, rock’s Bozo Dionysus, a real poet?”  asks Daniel Nester in an essay for The Poetry Foundation:  “There are two kinds of people in this world: those who think the Doors  are a hokey caricature of male rock stardom and those who think they’re,  you know, shamans.”
Nester’s essay assumes most of them, in their elder, wiser years, are  slightly embarrassed by their devotion to the man and the band. He’s  probably right. But he comes across serious people who have thought  about the matter seriously and have concluded that The Lizard King was a  serious poet. But maybe it’s all beside the point. As Nester reasons,  “I have stopped worrying whether James Douglas Morrison … can join the  tenuous tribe of poets. He’s been showing up for the meetings for so  long now, there’s no sense in throwing him out.”
What do you think? Is Jim Morrison a poet?

“Should we consider Jim Morrison, rock’s Bozo Dionysus, a real poet?” asks Daniel Nester in an essay for The Poetry Foundation: “There are two kinds of people in this world: those who think the Doors are a hokey caricature of male rock stardom and those who think they’re, you know, shamans.”

Nester’s essay assumes most of them, in their elder, wiser years, are slightly embarrassed by their devotion to the man and the band. He’s probably right. But he comes across serious people who have thought about the matter seriously and have concluded that The Lizard King was a serious poet. But maybe it’s all beside the point. As Nester reasons, “I have stopped worrying whether James Douglas Morrison … can join the tenuous tribe of poets. He’s been showing up for the meetings for so long now, there’s no sense in throwing him out.”

What do you think? Is Jim Morrison a poet?

Although it evokes the senses through language, poetry typically doesn’t  often stimulate the reader’s sensory organs—save some passive  recognition by the eyes and, occasionally, ears. Poet Stephanie Barber,  however, has found a way to craft verse that tickles your feet and  delights the eyes, nose, and mind. Barber writes her poetry with grass. Keep reading …

Although it evokes the senses through language, poetry typically doesn’t often stimulate the reader’s sensory organs—save some passive recognition by the eyes and, occasionally, ears. Poet Stephanie Barber, however, has found a way to craft verse that tickles your feet and delights the eyes, nose, and mind. Barber writes her poetry with grass. Keep reading …

Modern literature is uninspired, complains poet Bei Dao, whose acclaimed  poems helped fuel China’s pro-democracy movement in the ’70s and ’80s  and led to his exile for decades. He blames the literary decline on  mindless consumerism and base entertainment. Keep reading …

Modern literature is uninspired, complains poet Bei Dao, whose acclaimed poems helped fuel China’s pro-democracy movement in the ’70s and ’80s and led to his exile for decades. He blames the literary decline on mindless consumerism and base entertainment. Keep reading …

If the death of a beautiful woman is unquestionably the most poetical topic in the world, as Edgar Allen Poe famously argued in 1846, then is the death of a beautiful woman’s child the second most poetical topic? So it would seem to filmmaker Terrence Malick, whose artful Tree of Life tries to gain emotional weight from actress Jessica Chastain’s soulful eyes and shapely ankles in the role of Mrs. O’Brien, a 1950s housewife whose son tragically dies. Keep reading …

A Post-Independence Day Collection of Red, White, and Blue Poems

Courtesy of Poets.org.

Red

The Red Wheelbarrow
by William Carlos Williams

A Red Palm
by Gary Soto

A Red, Red Rose
by Robert Burns

Red Lilies
by Barbara Guest

Red Slippers
by Amy Lowell

The Red Poppy
by Louise Glück

Red Poppy
by Tess Gallagher

will the red hand throw me?
by Matthew Rohrer

Red Cloth
by Jean Valentine

Red Quiet, Section 3
by Mei-mei Berssenbrugge

White 

Snow White and the Seven Dwarves
by Anne Sexton

The White Fires of Venus  
by Denis Johnson

The White Room
by Charles Simic

White
by J. Michael Martinez

White Box (Notes)
by Laura Mullen

White Clover
by Marvin Bell

my dream about being white
by Lucille Clifton

The White Horse
by D.H. Lawrence

White Spring
by Lisa Olstein

White Apples
by Donald Hall

Blue 

Blues
by Elizabeth Alexander

Waking in the Blue
by Robert Lowell

Immigrant Blues
by Li-Young Lee

At the Blue Note
by Pablo Medina

The Weary Blues
by Langston Hughes

The Blue Terrance
by Terrance Hayes

The Blue Stairs
by Barbara Guest

The Blue Anchor
by Jane Cooper

The Blue
by David Baker

Vision from the Blue Plane-Window
by Ernesto Cardenal
translated by Jonathan Cohen