Barbara Ehrenreich still taking chances, telling it like it is:
Preying On the Poor
 …the poor in aggregate provide a juicy target for anyone depraved enough to make a business of stealing from them. The trick is to rob them in ways that are systematic, impersonal, and almost impossible to trace to individual perpetrators. Employers, for example, can simply program their computers to shave a few dollars off each paycheck, or they can require workers to show up 30 minutes or more before the time clock starts ticking.
Read more: http://www.utne.com/politics/preying-on-the-poor.aspx#ixzz1vEF8QFwm

Barbara Ehrenreich still taking chances, telling it like it is:

Preying On the Poor

…the poor in aggregate provide a juicy target for anyone depraved enough to make a business of stealing from them. The trick is to rob them in ways that are systematic, impersonal, and almost impossible to trace to individual perpetrators. Employers, for example, can simply program their computers to shave a few dollars off each paycheck, or they can require workers to show up 30 minutes or more before the time clock starts ticking.

Poolside in Poverty
Margot Page wants her family to learn Spanish. She’d like her children to understand, really understand, what a privileged life they lead in the U.S. She takes them to Nicaragua. Her kids aren’t the only ones to realize that our world is unfair, complicated, and confusing on the norm.
Read more: http://www.utne.com/literature/reflections-on-a-Visit-to-Nicaragua.aspx#ixzz1szSBuG92

Poolside in Poverty

Margot Page wants her family to learn Spanish. She’d like her children to understand, really understand, what a privileged life they lead in the U.S. She takes them to Nicaragua. Her kids aren’t the only ones to realize that our world is unfair, complicated, and confusing on the norm.

Tags: poverty

What Would it Take to for social entrepreneurship to help pull people out of poverty? An interview with Solomon Prakash, India’s local director of Ashoka.

What would it take for social entrepreneurship to make serious inroads into poverty? 
If you tackle a problem like poverty head on, you need a set of  people on your core team who share your vision. This can be a  challenge.
The difference between a social entrepreneur and a business  entrepreneur is one of commitment and vision. In a business, you might  bail out once you’d made enough money. In social entrepreneurship, you  believe you can solve a problem and that others will work with you to  solve that problem. That core team needs to grow; otherwise, you don’t  have the skills to manage the project as it grows. You need talented  people who are both committed and dedicated, who are willing to live and  work in isolated areas in poor conditions for very little money.  Sometimes people want to work in a social enterprise because the work is  different. “I may not have much money,” they say, “but my soul is  satisfied and I feel happy because I’ve made a contribution.”
We also need to think creatively about funding because there  are serious challenges in the kind of finances available. Increasingly,  granting organizations are looking at things like returnable grants or  interest-free loans to make their money last longer. Some people are  talking about “social venture” funding, which is a similar model to  private venture capital funding. They’re expecting returns similar to  microfinancing, which was hugely profitable. But that’s not going to  happen.

Keep reading …

What Would it Take to for social entrepreneurship to help pull people out of poverty? An interview with Solomon Prakash, India’s local director of Ashoka.

What would it take for social entrepreneurship to make serious inroads into poverty? 

If you tackle a problem like poverty head on, you need a set of people on your core team who share your vision. This can be a challenge.

The difference between a social entrepreneur and a business entrepreneur is one of commitment and vision. In a business, you might bail out once you’d made enough money. In social entrepreneurship, you believe you can solve a problem and that others will work with you to solve that problem. That core team needs to grow; otherwise, you don’t have the skills to manage the project as it grows. You need talented people who are both committed and dedicated, who are willing to live and work in isolated areas in poor conditions for very little money. Sometimes people want to work in a social enterprise because the work is different. “I may not have much money,” they say, “but my soul is satisfied and I feel happy because I’ve made a contribution.”

We also need to think creatively about funding because there are serious challenges in the kind of finances available. Increasingly, granting organizations are looking at things like returnable grants or interest-free loans to make their money last longer. Some people are talking about “social venture” funding, which is a similar model to private venture capital funding. They’re expecting returns similar to microfinancing, which was hugely profitable. But that’s not going to happen.

Keep reading …

Sensing the urgency of racial segregation in America, software developer Jim Vallandingham programmed a data visualization that shows many of the top 10 most segregated cities breaking apart along racial lines. Take, for example, St. Louis, Missouri (pictured top). In Vallandingham’s animation, the mostly black core of St. Louis is abandoned by the first-ring suburbs, leaving a vast cultural moat between neighborhoods. Exurbia, for all of its sprawl, remains a tightly knit (or at least similarly skin-colored) community.

Read more, and try the visualizer …

The data on the poor in this country announced Tuesday by the Census Bureau was not good, and due to measures already taken by Congress and those  likely to come, the outlook doesn’t provide much reason for hope. Read what commentators at Mother Jones, In These Times, The Take Away, City Limits, and The Atlantic have to say about it …

The data on the poor in this country announced Tuesday by the Census Bureau was not good, and due to measures already taken by Congress and those likely to come, the outlook doesn’t provide much reason for hope. Read what commentators at Mother Jones, In These Times, The Take Away, City Limits, and The Atlantic have to say about it …

hollow-gram:

More Americans lived in poverty in 2010 than in any other time that records have been collected, according to US Census data released yesterday. Median household income fell, too, and a growing number of people are without health insurance. 

An additional 2.6 million people became officially poor last year, raising the poverty rate from 14.3 percent in 2009 to 15.1 percent. It was the fourth year in a row that the ranks of the poor grew, and Sawhill predicts poverty rates will rise to 16 percent by 2014.

(via xxxx43)

secretrepublic:

The Suburbanization of Poverty: An Infographic

secretrepublic:

The Suburbanization of Poverty: An Infographic

(via ziatroyano)

Here’s a taste:

At the time I wrote Nickel and Dimed, I wasn’t sure how many people it directly applied to—only that the official definition of poverty was way off the mark, since it defined an individual earning $7 an hour, as I did on average, as well out of poverty. But three months after the book was published, the Economic Policy Institute in Washington, D.C., issued a report entitled “Hardships in America: The Real Story of Working Families,” which found an astounding 29% of American families living in what could be more reasonably defined as poverty, meaning that they earned less than a barebones budget covering housing, child care, health care, food, transportation, and taxes—though not, it should be noted, any entertainment, meals out, cable TV, Internet service, vacations, or holiday gifts. Twenty-nine percent is a minority, but not a reassuringly small one, and other studies in the early 2000s came up with similar figures.

The big question, 10 years later, is whether things have improved or worsened for those in the bottom third of the income distribution, the people who clean hotel rooms, work in warehouses, wash dishes in restaurants, care for the very young and very old, and keep the shelves stocked in our stores. The short answer is that things have gotten much worse, especially since the economic downturn that began in 2008.

Read the rest …

Angst-ridden films like American Beauty and Revolutionary Road depict suburbia as an incubator of emptiness, portraying the “poverty” of middle-class comfort and sameness. But Governing reports that as of 2008 the suburbs of the nation’s largest metro areas were home to “1.5 million more poor residents than the cities themselves,” suggesting that modern-day suburban anxiety has little to do with Hollywood’s back-lot realism.

"His house is like a soup kitchen. He constantly has guests, people with nothing, who stay with him and his wife. I used to study Talmud with him—he’s now in his 60s—and as we’d study we’d also schmooze. During one of our schmoozes the idea came up to launch a more formal, systematic way of feeding the hungry."

Alexander Rapaport, executive director of the New York Metropolitan Council on Jewish Poverty, on Masbia, kosher restaurants that offer sustainable, free meals to those in need.