robertreich:

As Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr., wrote in 1904, “taxes are the price we pay for a civilized society.”

But the wealthiest Americans, who haven’t raked in as much of America’s income and wealth since the 1920s, are today paying a lower tax rate than they have in over thirty years. Even…

thenewrepublic:

A few weeks ago, Warren Buffet caught some flack from conservatives for an OpEd in the New York Times in which he argued that the rich are undertaxed.  
The Wall Street Journal editorial page:
“If he’s worried about being undertaxed, we’d suggest he simply write a big check to Uncle Sam and go back to his day job of picking investments”.
Jonathan Chait’s blog suggests that such criticism is misguided- wealthy people who favor higher taxes on the rich don’t just believe they should pay more taxes. They believe the government needs more revenue.
So are the recent rumors true? Will one of the wealthiest figures in modern America step down as the Berkshire CEO to focus full time on philanthropy?
Courtesy of mint.com

thenewrepublic:

A few weeks ago, Warren Buffet caught some flack from conservatives for an OpEd in the New York Times in which he argued that the rich are undertaxed.  

The Wall Street Journal editorial page:

“If he’s worried about being undertaxed, we’d suggest he simply write a big check to Uncle Sam and go back to his day job of picking investments”.

Jonathan Chait’s blog suggests that such criticism is misguided- wealthy people who favor higher taxes on the rich don’t just believe they should pay more taxes. They believe the government needs more revenue.

So are the recent rumors true? Will one of the wealthiest figures in modern America step down as the Berkshire CEO to focus full time on philanthropy?

Courtesy of mint.com

"Twenty-two percent of men who have been Boy Scouts graduate from college compared to 16 percent of non-Scouts; 19 percent of men who have been Boy Scouts achieve a postgraduate education, compared with 13 percent of non-Scouts. Men who have been Boy Scouts also report higher annual incomes."

— With the Boy Scouts of America turning 100 years old last year, academics and statisticians are churning out a bumper crop of studies on the long-lasting organization. Some of them are interesting, others inexplicable. Read more …

It’s a telling sign of our time when it’s a struggle to actually talk about the value of things and not just the price they are supposedly worth. When we struggle to discuss what actually makes something worth its weight in gold, so to speak, and not some speculative number put on it. Does it keep up safe from the elements? Does it sate our hunger? Quench our thirst? Educate our children? These are what actually make things worthwhile, but all we talk about are what those things cost, which is too often defined by, at best, speculation and at worst, deceit.
This is the thrust behind David Korten’s idea of phantom wealth and real wealth. Read more …

It’s a telling sign of our time when it’s a struggle to actually talk about the value of things and not just the price they are supposedly worth. When we struggle to discuss what actually makes something worth its weight in gold, so to speak, and not some speculative number put on it. Does it keep up safe from the elements? Does it sate our hunger? Quench our thirst? Educate our children? These are what actually make things worthwhile, but all we talk about are what those things cost, which is too often defined by, at best, speculation and at worst, deceit.

This is the thrust behind David Korten’s idea of phantom wealth and real wealth. Read more …

Is eating locally just another status symbol? Get together with  certain members of the locavore movement, and you’ll hear conversations  about the cost of CSAs and the cost of timeshares, rare heirloom seeds  and rare art acquisitions. Troll the aisles of your neighborhood co-op  grocery, and you’ll find a strange financial homogeneity in much of the  clientele: These are people who can afford a five-dollar pint of  strawberries.
Slowly, though, the local food movement is inching toward inclusion and social justice. Read more …

Is eating locally just another status symbol? Get together with certain members of the locavore movement, and you’ll hear conversations about the cost of CSAs and the cost of timeshares, rare heirloom seeds and rare art acquisitions. Troll the aisles of your neighborhood co-op grocery, and you’ll find a strange financial homogeneity in much of the clientele: These are people who can afford a five-dollar pint of strawberries.

Slowly, though, the local food movement is inching toward inclusion and social justice. Read more …

Last March, the Insight Center for Community Economic Development released the revelatory report “Lifting as We Climb: Women of Color, Wealth, and America’s Future,” which measures wealth gaps according to gender and race. The results are a national embarrassment, but it’s a good guess that you missed the story—because almost no one deemed the data newsworthy.